Thursday, March 25, 2010

Church of England publishes General Election prayers

The Church of England has published prayers and compiled useful information to help voters as they consider their options in the forthcoming General Election:

Loving God,

Thank you for caring about how our country is run, and that we have the right to vote for our politicians and government.

But in the run-up to this general election there are so many policies to understand, and so many different points of view to consider - sometimes I wonder whether there's any point in voting, whether anyone cares what I think.

As I choose who I am going to vote for, help me not to be cynical about politics and politicians,

help me to remember that my vote can make a difference,

and help me vote for those people who will protect the poor and vulnerable, and do all they can to make our nation a place of fairness and peace.

Because you call us to act justly, love mercy and walk humbly with you, our God.

Amen.

Heavenly Father,

source of all truth and wisdom, who knows and loves the whole creation,

watch over our nation at election time:

that truth may prevail over distortion,

wisdom triumph over recklessness

and the concerns of every person be heard.

Lord Jesus,

who chose the way of the cross in the Garden of Gethsemane,

help us to turn our backs on self interest

and to support policies that sustain the poor, the vulnerable and the frightened people of this world.

Holy Spirit,

who brought understanding among myriad peoples and languages at Pentecost,

give to all your people a passion for peace

and inspire us to work for unity and co-operation throughout the world and in our political life together.

Amen.

Lord, we give thanks for the privileges and responsibilities of living in a democratic society.

Give us wisdom to play our part at election time,

that, through the exercise of each vote,

your Kingdom may come closer.

Protect us from the sins of despair and cynicism,

guard us against the idols of false utopias

and strengthen us to make politics a noble calling

that serves the common good of all.

We ask this in the name of Jesus Christ Our Lord.

Amen.

His Grace was sorely tempted to fisk, but managed to overcome his acerbic cynicism.

Just.

47 Comments:

Anonymous TheGlovner said...

"and help me vote for those people who will protect the poor and vulnerable, and do all they can to make our nation a place of fairness and peace."

It ain't prayers you need to provide that, it is at least one candidate who will actually provide these things.

Unfortunately I don't think prayers or reality will provide it.

25 March 2010 at 13:28  
Blogger Jared Gaites said...

Seeing how the CofE have gone Trappist over much of the damage that has been caused, I don't think a few prayers posted on the web will make any difference to people who have learnt to expect jack shit when it comes to voicing the Christian opinion. Amen

25 March 2010 at 13:28  
Anonymous Graham Davis said...

How touching that the CofE still has the enthusiasm for prayers. Unfortunately some rather more earthly deliberations are necessary.

I am somewhat surprised that Cranmer has not yet commented on the Budget. So here is one I prepared earlier:


My Budget

Income:

1. Abolish Income tax.
2. Raise VAT in bands from 10% to 30% increasing with the value of the purchase and with a limit to the amount that business/individuals can reclaim. Current exemptions still apply.
3. Allow Local Authorities to raise taxes other than property taxes if they wish.
4. Apply a 0.05% Tobin tax on financial transactions.
5. Corporation tax and NIS as is.
6. Capital gains tax of 5% applied to sale of all homes.

Advantages are:
Simpler to administer resulting in a much smaller Revenue and Customs.
Less opportunity for avoidance/fraud as the VAT tax is collected at source.
Local authorities can compete with low/no tax or high service offerings.

Expenditure:

1. 2 year pay freeze for all public sector employees with a pay reduction of 5% for those earning more than £35,000 and 10% for those earning over £90,000.
2. End all public sector final salary pension schemes but taper this over a 10 year period.
3. To qualify for Child Benefit you must be 25 years old and that benefit does not kick in until the child is 5 years old.
4. Unemployment benefit can only be paid after an employability test has been taken, if failed compulsory *retraining must be undertaken with a lower level of benefit payment until a satisfactory standard has been reached.
5. Health service budget to be reduced with particular reduction in Primary Care contracts.
6. Patient obligation contracts to be introduced in order to reduce time wasting and missed appointments.
7. Education expenditure to be increased in order to attract better qualified teacher particularly in the Primary sector.
8. Trident replacement to be scrapped.
9. MPs to be paid £120,000 pa.

Advantages are:

To reduce government expenditure
To reduce the benefit trap
To increase the work force skills
To make people more responsible for their own health


General political/social/educational reforms

* To create a more employable workforce all students aged 16 to undertake a General Competence Exit exam before they can leave school or seek work. If they fail they remain in school and will keep retaking it until age 19. (this is in addition to GCSE exams but these are not subject to an exit grade)

A fundamental aim of education will be to instil personal and social responsibility as well as academic success.

Members of Parliament to be reduced to around 350 based around County constituencies. Second chamber to be reduced by a similar amount.

Minimum age for entering Parliament will be 32 and a level of non-political competence and experience will be required.

Parliament to be a fixed five year term.

Lobbying parliament with or without payment will be illegal.

The present Houses of Parliament will be turned into a museum and parliament will rotate between three new locations: Outer London/Birmingham/Leeds.

The Queen will be replaced by an elected head of state and the funding of the monarchy and civil list phased out over a 10 year period.

Second Chamber will be fully elected with local/regional ballots.

Renegotiate our relationship with the EU in order to repatriate more of our decision making and reduce our payments.

In the private sector remuneration of top earners to be limited to a maximum income as a multiple of the average worker salary.


I commend this budget to the Cranmer blog!

25 March 2010 at 13:49  
Blogger Archbishop Cranmer said...

Mr Graham Davis,

His Grace did not comment on the budget because it bored him to even more ashes.

Cider, Belize and a Mansion tax.

That's about it.

Frankly, it was nothing but a student budget, just about worthy of the Oxford Union.

25 March 2010 at 14:00  
Blogger Gnostic said...

Peole are more likely to pray for God to send down a huge bolt of lightning and fry every last one of the thieving scumbags.

25 March 2010 at 14:30  
Anonymous Graham Davis said...

Cranmer said...
“Frankly, it was nothing but a student budget, just about worthy of the Oxford Union”.

Nothing like the “heady” days of Lord Treasurers Winchester and Burghley then, or perhaps it had got a little hot for you by then?

25 March 2010 at 14:39  
Blogger Jared Gaites said...

I get the impression that the Church is having this weird recurring nightmare that there are millions of Christians out there with their Biros paused above the BNP tick boxes on the electoral forms. I am not sure how to describe this to be honest. If it is not the church goers they are beseeching then who exactly is it that they are trying to influence?

It's all rather amusing to think that the church could persuade BNP voters to think again. They can't even fill the pews on a Sunday.

There is a slight left wing slant to what they are suggesting and maybe His Grace should have made a few things clear in this post.

Word verification = Waysisc (honestly)

25 March 2010 at 14:45  
Blogger D. Singh said...

Your Grace

One of the prayers begins:

‘Lord Jesus

‘Who chose the way of the cross in the Garden of Gethsemane,

‘Help us to turn our backs on self interest…’

I suggest Judaeo-Christians do not say this prayer.

25 March 2010 at 14:52  
Blogger Anabaptist said...

Actually, Mr Singh, Christians don't 'say prayers'. They pray.

And if you really object to the idea of turning our backs on self-interest, that seems to confirm what nearly all your previous posts have implied: that you have no understanding whatsoever of the ethics of Christian living, rooted in self-denial in following Jesus.

As for you Cranny, it's a pity you resisted the temptation to fisk, as the C of E very kindly printed it double-spaced to allow precisely that facility.

25 March 2010 at 15:27  
Blogger D. Singh said...

What the blazes

25 March 2010 at 15:29  
Blogger Dreadnaught said...

...Protect us from the sins of despair and cynicism...

Chortle.

25 March 2010 at 15:39  
Blogger Anabaptist said...

Glovner wrote:
'"and help me vote for those people who will protect the poor and vulnerable, and do all they can to make our nation a place of fairness and peace."

It ain't prayers you need to provide that, it is at least one candidate who will actually provide these things.'


Well said Mr Glovner. If the C of E really thought that through they would be campaigning for our withdrawal from the EU, whose CFP and tarriff barriers do terrible damage to the welfare of very poor people, especially in Africa. They would be campaigning against the AGW fanatics, whose big-money 'Carbon' trading backers are lining their pockets at the expense of poor people, and who are some of the most voracious bandits on the face of the earth.

25 March 2010 at 15:39  
Blogger D. Singh said...

Oh Mr Anabaptist! How much longer must I suffer you?

‘It is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer, or the baker, that we expect our dinner, but from their regard to their own interest. We address ourselves not to their humanity but their self love.’

Adam Smith, Wealth of Nations (1776)

Need I remind you that there is a world of difference between self interest and selfishness?

25 March 2010 at 15:39  
Anonymous Alice said...

Ha! In one prayer we pray to be guarded against false utopias and in another for 'unity and co-operation throughout the world'. How will God sort that out, I wonder?

25 March 2010 at 15:42  
Blogger Anabaptist said...

You don't have to suffer me at all, Mr Singh. Nobody obliges you to read a word I write.

As you will be aware, the precise words of the 'prayer' you denigrate probably didn't take their starting point from Adam Smith. You know very well what they mean.

Maybe if words like 'blazes' and questions like 'how much longer must I suffer you?' and threats of dogs, and the like did not suffuse your rhetoric, your posts might read a little more like things written by a Christian.

Sorry to prolong your suffering.

25 March 2010 at 15:46  
Blogger Anabaptist said...

Mr Jared Gaites, when you wrote, 'I get the impression that the Church is having this weird recurring nightmare that there are millions of Christians out there with their Biros paused above the BNP tick boxes on the electoral forms...' I suspect you were not a million miles away from the truth.

25 March 2010 at 15:48  
Blogger English Viking said...

Nonsense. That's just about the only word for these 'prayers'.

Two observations; I know of no instance in The Bible where cynicism or despair are described as sins; nowhere in The Bible is a believer instructed to pray directly to The Holy Spirit, nor are their ANY examples of ANY believer doing this.


Dear Lord,

Please spare this nation from the liars and thieves that have hi-jacked positions of leadership, both in Government and the Churches, reveal those wicked men and women, who claim to want to help only the poor, when in reality they wish only to be rich, remove those idolators who speak of harmony with others, when your word says 'Him only shalt thou serve', and as for those who promote perversity as wholesome, iniquity as righteousness, lies as truth and wrong as right, the oppressors of the widows and the fatherless, the scourge of the poor, the ignorant of the sick and the weak, because they vaingloriously think themselves healthy and strong, we humbly beseech thee to reward them, according to their deeds.

These things we ask in and through the name of thy beloved Son, The Lord Jesus Christ,

Amen.

25 March 2010 at 16:07  
Blogger English Viking said...

PS Typo, there not their.

25 March 2010 at 16:09  
Blogger Jared Gaites said...

Anabaptist

Well, I don't really know. But I will tell what I have discovered to be an odd thing. I watched the debate on TV between the two leaders of the Christian Party and the BNP, and I thought it was dam good and most interesting. I was curious to the point of venturing over to the Welsh Christian Party web site. I downloaded an application form to join, I was only curious to see what the criteria was, if any. I discovered that you cannot join the Christian Party unless a church leader and one other church witness does countersign your application form. I found this criteria most disconcerting, it assumes far to much about the definition of a Christian.

25 March 2010 at 16:18  
Blogger D. Singh said...

Mr Anabaptist

I have, at least in the past, credited to you a modicum of intelligence.

No where have I suggested that the prayers should have taken their starting point from the writings of Adam Smith.

Wha I have done is reveal that the author of the prayer in question is confused about the meaning and effects of self interest and selfishness.

The man on the Clapham Omnibus would read that prayer as an 'instruction' to reject self interest - which is clearly immoral.

Rejecting selfishness is clearly moral.

I must say it is unlike you to launch ad hominem attacks.

25 March 2010 at 16:49  
Blogger Anabaptist said...

Mr Singh, you write, 'I must say it is unlike you to launch ad hominem attacks.''

I've been restraining myself, but could do so no longer. You set yourself out as a Christian, and give the impression to those who read this blog but do not share our faith that the way you express yourself, and therefore the way you see things, is an expression of Christianity. But you speak with violence, vengefulness and often, it seems, spite. Somebody needs to say that your way of saying things, and many of your meanings, are not worthy of a Christian spirit.

You frequently give the impression of being like those disciples whom Jesus rebuked when they asked if they could call down fire from heaven like Elijah to devour his enemies. He told them they they did not know what manner of spirit they were of.

On specifics, I didn't accuse you of suggesting that prayers should take their starting points form the writings of Adam Smith. I accused you of assuming that the writers of the 'prayer' were using the term self interest in the same way that it was used by Smith. It is perfectly obvious that the writer was talking about self-centredness, and I reckon that's how the person on the Clapham omnibus would understand it.

By the way, I have not stooped to impugning your intelligence, which is one of your frequent approaches to contributors here, and appears again in your first sentence to me. Personally, I don't mind, actually, as I don't have a particularly high opinion of my brain power; but it is a rhetorical device that falls far too easily to your hand in my opinion, along with your frequent admonitions that people would shut their gobs, and other such niceties. Do you actually want to win and persuade, or merely to antagonise?

You'll find it hard to believe, my friend, but I actually mean these comments to be helpful. I have often wanted to write, 'You non-Christians out there, please note that Mr Singh is not speaking as a Christian should', but I have thought it better to address you directly. I would have spoken privately, but have no means of doing so.

By the way, an ad hominem attack would be one in which somebody's arguments are not answered but instead the attacker would seek to impugn that person's character as a means of giving the impression that his arguments are themselves invalid. I don't think I have used that deplorable tactic.

I'm sure you have a fine mind; I just wish you would use it constructively and with a genuine Christian spirit.

25 March 2010 at 17:20  
Anonymous not a machine said...

Oh come on Graham Davies we have had one weak socialist political budget already , I can only assume you are another "systems" man and will need to be head of the stasi to keep it all running and out of the red tops .
What about loosening the grip of corporate client state , what about education standards , drugs enforcement .I might go along with minmum age and life experience for mps as an idea, but an elected second chamber (more cost) ,besides could you not then fill the chamber with a party not to your liking and have no check or balances over the 10yr cycle.

My Prayer
Oh Lord , please lobby our future government and let them see the errors and fantasies they have indulged in .No person is without sin , but please lord stop them from institutionalising it further into our peoples conciousness before they travell further down the road the sales and marketing idols .
Whilst you have told us not to store up earthly riches and things that moths eat ,I hope that the trading of our commonwealth gold reserves for junk market speculation is a worthy question which muct be answered.
Let us trade amd toil in goods that benefit us and your creation and if possible go organic and look after all your creatures better without genetically modifying.
Give our church the bishops and ministers that are wise in scripture and defending the faith to empower them to serve our people and to teach people to live and do what is right in your ways.
Give us rest in our troubles and joy in your word and doing what is right.

Amen

25 March 2010 at 17:21  
Blogger D. Singh said...

Mr Anabaptist

You wrote: 'I accused you of assuming that the writers of the 'prayer' were using the term self interest in the same way that it was used by Smith.'

Then you have either not read the Wealth of Nations and what Smith meant by 'self-interest' or alternatively you have and misunderstood what he meant by 'self-interest'. The reason why I quoted Smith was to assist your thinking. Clearly, I have failed.

My methods and manner of defending Judaeo-Christianity are 'gladitorial'; they are not 'muscular' in the way of C.S. Lewis.

I noticed that when the supporters of Dawkins came here for a sharp exchange of intellectual views: your brothers missed your analytical abilities.

25 March 2010 at 17:40  
Blogger D. Singh said...

Mr Anabaptist

You wrote: 'And if you really object to the idea of turning our backs on self-interest, that seems to confirm what nearly all your previous posts have implied: that you have no understanding whatsoever of the ethics of Christian living, rooted in self-denial in following Jesus.'

I really do object to 'turning our backs on self-interest.'

It is immoral.

There.

I now invite you to state: 'Mr Singh has no understanding whatsoever of the ethics of Christian living...' for the sake of the record.

I believe you won't: your courage has deserted you.

25 March 2010 at 17:51  
Blogger Anabaptist said...

No, I haven't read The Wealth of Nations', nor have I claimed to do so. Neither, I suspect, has the author of the 'prayer'. Neither has the person on the Clapham omnibus. Neither has hardly anyone else, though I am sure it is an excellent work.

I was, however, familiar with the fragment of it that you quoted, and have no quarrel with either the words or the concept, which I understand clearly enough. My disagreement is with your assumption that everybody uses or must use the term 'self interest' in the way that Smith uses it. It seems obvious to me, and I expect to nearly everybody else in the world, that the 'prayer' was using the term to refer to self-centredness.

I have put it to you that your 'gladiatorial' approach is not appropriate to that which you profess to defend.

And finally, as I have already explained -- but perhaps you missed it -- I was out of the country for the whole time the Dawkins spat took place, knew nothing of it, and was very disappointed on later reading it to have missed the opportunity to join in.

Thank you for kindly suggesting that I have analytical abilities. You rate them, it seems, more highly that I do. But I should certainly have liked to participate.

25 March 2010 at 17:54  
Blogger D. Singh said...

Mr Anabaptist

You wrote in your last post: ‘It seems obvious to me, and I expect to nearly everybody else in the world, that the 'prayer' was using the term to refer to self-centredness.’

It seems then that we agree that the man on the Clapham Omnibus would read it as selfishness and therefore the author of the prayer is in error.

I refer you to my earlier post: ‘Oh Mr Anabaptist! How much longer must I suffer you?

‘It is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer, or the baker, that we expect our dinner, but from their regard to their own interest. We address ourselves not to their humanity but their self love.’

‘Adam Smith, Wealth of Nations (1776)

‘Need I remind you that there is a world of difference between self interest and selfishness? ‘

25 March 2010 at 18:01  
Blogger D. Singh said...

That is in error in that self-interest is confused with selfishness.

25 March 2010 at 18:03  
Blogger D. Singh said...

Mr Anabaptist

Let me make it quite clear self-interest is good. Selfishness is wrong.

It is written: 'Lazy hands make a man poor, but diligent hands bring wealth.'

25 March 2010 at 18:11  
Blogger Anabaptist said...

This is my final riposte to you Mr Singh. I can see I am not getting through.

Your latest comment arrived just as I had finished typing mine, or I would have included this.

Now you aren't impugning my intelligence, you have turned to questioning my courage. Frankly, I don't care if you think me a coward or a fool.

But I'll just turn, with a bit more clarification to your latest tirade, in which you say,


"I really do object to 'turning our backs on self-interest.'

It is immoral.

There.

I now invite you to state: 'Mr Singh has no understanding whatsoever of the ethics of Christian living...' for the sake of the record.

I believe you won't: your courage has deserted you.


If the term 'self interest' is used in the way that most people (except for you and Adam Smith) would understand it, that is, as self-centredness, then please think about the words of the apostle:

'...in lowliness of mind each counting other better than himself; not looking each of you to his own things, but each of you also to the things of others. Have this mind in you, which was also in Christ Jesus: who, existing in the form of God, counted not the being on an equality with God a thing to be grasped, but emptied himself, taking the form of a servant, being made in the likeness of men; and being found in fashion as a man, he humbled himself, becoming obedient even unto death, yea, the death of the cross.'

That's the way Christians are urged to think, Mr Singh. That's the mind they are commanded to make their own mind. That's what you seem incapable of understanding.

I have already quoted the admonition of Jesus against his would-be gladiatorial disciples.

So as things stand, and for the sake of the record, I repeat, that if your inveighings against the writer of the 'prayer' and many of your other attitudes are anything to go by, you appear to have have no understanding whatsoever of the ethics of Christian living.

I should add that my own personal failings are nothing to write home about, and I am a very poor example; but at least I recognise when I am acting contrary to the spirit of Jesus.

And now, as I preview this, I see yet another three have come from you, and you still don't get it.

25 March 2010 at 18:13  
Blogger D. Singh said...

Mr Anabaptist

There is something else I've observed about your method of debate. You subtly switch from: 'self-interest' to 'selfishness' to 'self-centredness'.

It reminds me of Satan's brilliant tactic of sowing doubt: '“Did God really say you must not eat any of the fruit in the garden?” (Genesis 3:1)

25 March 2010 at 18:20  
Blogger Jonathan said...

Prayer is crucial. For starters, prayer implies faith, not only in God but in God's hand here on earth. However, it implies prayer is hollow and rehearsed when we don't act on or have passion for what we pray for. If we don't know how to act, it's good to just do what we can in our own backyards. England's been through worse spots.

25 March 2010 at 18:21  
Anonymous TheGlovner said...

Hear Hear Anabaptist.

Nice to see that there are yet more views an atheist and one of religious mind can agree on.

Whether you deem D.Singh's attitude to be unchristian or I deem it to be inhuman it both amounts to the same thing.

That it is a very distasteful nature he promotes and not one that either a christian or an atheist would or should be proud to display.

25 March 2010 at 18:32  
Anonymous TheGlovner said...

And D.Singh.

For you to "notice" the imperfections in anothers method of debate?

I may be paraphrasing, I am sure those more religiously learned than my can confirm though, but:

"Let he who is without sin cast the first stone"

25 March 2010 at 18:34  
Blogger D. Singh said...

Glovy: you are not paraphrasing and an excellent quote.

Let me remove the wooden beam in my eye so that I may see more clearly.

25 March 2010 at 18:37  
Blogger D. Singh said...

And Glovy: shut yer gob.

25 March 2010 at 18:38  
Anonymous Atlas shrugged said...

There is so much inherently dangerous nonsense within this so called prayer it is difficult to know where to start.

In general the problem is with definition. What does self-interest actually mean in practice?

For the term acting in ones self-interest can and does genuinely mean different things to different people. It could be argued that looking after oneself IS by definition looking after society in general as well as ones nearest and dearest.

For it is surely clear that if everyone was, or was given the means of up holding their own self interest themselves sufficiently, society would be as close to heaven on earth as it could possibly get. In any case a fare lot better place to reside in than it is today.

We do not still have starvation in the 3rd, and 2nd world because people in general do not care about those less wealthy then themselves. They clearly do and have done so for a very long time. Charity, and related empathy for other human beings is perfectly natural human traits. This is largely what defines human being as being such.

LOVE is after all is said and done the only answer, and therefore the only real truth.

Established religion is by definition the religion that works hand in glove with any given establishment, or established political and/or financial system.

It is not now, and never has been in the past the ordinary people who have started, perpetuated, and therefore greatly profit from wars, and other forms of created chaos. It goes without saying that these things are wholly the preserve of The Ruling class and the established religions that control them, or work along side them.

Perpetuating the illusion of free and open democracy is therefore very much in the SELF-INTERESTS of all established religion, as well as all of the less well established ones. Hence the creation of this prayer.

Therefore this so called prayer has got nothing to do with the wishes of God the father or the son. It is a political creation, where it is not also a party politically motivated one.

It is a prayer to help preserve the established order, whatever that may be these days.

Politics is for politicians, and the poor suckers that persist in trusting the perfectly corrupted, infinitely controllable and therefore utterly controlled, party political system that their selected representatives knowingly or otherwise infest.

However history teaches us that the most powerful unelected politicians of them all have always been the priesthoods.

If the higher parts of the church cared about the ordinary people, which by all historical evidence thus available, they never have. They would be calling for the collapse of a system that has brought us almost continuous national and international wars, other murderously evil conflicts and economic mayhems since way way before any of us were born. Not indeed the exact opposite, as is self-evidently the case with this highly politicised so called prayer.

If Jesus had not already expressly vacated it, the forever more miss-understood and miss-represented, divinely conceived individual, would start and never finish spinning in his grave, after hearing this particular piece of slimy green corporatist state sponsored propaganda.

25 March 2010 at 19:22  
Blogger ukipwebmaster said...

And UKIP publish manifesto:

http://www.ukip.org/media/policies/UKIPManifestoWeb.pdf

25 March 2010 at 19:33  
Anonymous len said...

I think time is running out for the kingdom of man, left to his own resources man will ultimately destroy himself and the planet.
God gave man free will and man has had thousands of years to set up a system, any system that works, all attempts have ended in abject failure.
I will therefore be praying that His kingdom comes and set up a rule of righteousness instead of the current shambles which seems to be mostly self serving.

25 March 2010 at 19:51  
Blogger Jared Gaites said...

Is it just me, or does anyone else wonder why God would want to set up His Kingdom upon the thin crusty surface of a small pathetic planet? I find the entire notion absurd.

25 March 2010 at 22:01  
Anonymous len said...

To wonder is a start.

25 March 2010 at 22:58  
Blogger Wyrdtimes said...

I don't suppose that "our country" was actually England was it?

25 March 2010 at 23:05  
Anonymous not a machine said...

Jared Gaites : No more absurd than a universe appearing out of fields of probebility !

The one question I sometimes ponder is why have all this confusion and conflict ,it seems so wastefull and inefficient ,but the again I know I am wrongly assuming that individual faith is all there is and that the communion is only for my benefit !


I will say this , when you have gone beyond the childlike understanding of faith it doesnt get any easier , you do however see glimpses of beauty and glory which words cannot describe .

26 March 2010 at 01:30  
Anonymous no nonny said...

"Lord, we give thanks for the privileges and responsibilities of living in a democratic society."

Well ... You know I did when we did, Lord.
But thank you for letting me see the difference between then and now; thank you for teaching me never to underestimate your Blessings. Please help me, indeed, all the better to know a Blessing when I see one!

Oh - and I pray that you'll help the other load of wot-nots to clear the scales from their eyes, bring this ship about, and avert its utter demolition. Cataracts are one thing; but, as the old hymn suggests - only you grant sight to the "inly blind."

26 March 2010 at 02:40  
Anonymous It's faith, stupid said...

Jared Gaites

Actually the Kingdom of God is better described as God's rule and reign in the hearts and minds of men and women.

This is, perhaps, an even stranger place to put a kingdom!

Now, if I were God ...

26 March 2010 at 08:09  
Blogger ENGLISHMAN said...

Who exactly are they beseeching us to vote for ,i see no-one who even remotely fits the bill,apart from the premeditated cameron foetus,whos soul is as yet unblemished.Rather the prayer should be"oh lord save us from the wrath of the muslims"

26 March 2010 at 10:56  
Blogger Bred in the bone said...

Oh and one more thing Lord, whoever gets in dont listen to them because they are all a bunch of two faced liars!

26 March 2010 at 18:14  
Blogger Bred in the bone said...

Sorry Lord I forget to say Amen to that, I know you laugh with me though, not at me ;-)

26 March 2010 at 18:16  

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