Sunday, November 07, 2010

Foundation X, Lord James of Blackheath, and the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow



A maverick, paranoid old peer who’s lost his marbles?

Or a respected industrialist who has had a real encounter with the ‘dark forces’ who really run the world?

ConservativeHome surprisingly linked yesterday to a Sky News interview with Lord James, who describes his dealings with a secret organisation called ‘Foundation X’.

His Grace says ‘surprisingly’, because it is the sort of issue with which if one attempts to engage one rapidly loses credibility and is invariably labelled a nutter, lunatic, fruitcake, extremist, conspiracy theorist, etc., etc. But being a man-made-global-warming-denying Christian of the Protestant Anglican variety who supports retention of the Act of Settlement and favours withdrawal from European Union, His Grace is well used to argumentum ad hominem.

In the interview, the Noble Lord claims that the Foundation wants ‘to help save the world’, and wishes to lend billions of pounds to Britain, interest free – in order to support a ‘massive improvement’ in the jobs market, fund renewable energy, build schools and hospitals, and help the construction of Crossrail – for which it will begin to provide the necessary funds if it receives a positive answer from the Government within the next week.

No strings, no interest, no repayment schedule…

Perhaps the Noble Lord might introduce His Grace to these nice people?

He talks of a ‘massive supranational accumulation of funds’ ordered by ‘the most powerful and the most high-profile people on the whole world stage…at the highest level of security’.

Hmm…

Sounds a bit Dan Brown.

Or Bilderberg.

Except that Dan Brown weaves a modicum of truth into his novels and Bilderberg are real enough for Margaret Thatcher to have considered it an honour to be excluded from and criticised by them.

The Noble Lord’s speech may be rather fantastical and utterly incredible, but it is now recorded for posterity in Hansard for generations of conspiracy theorists to pore over every detail, just as they still do with the death of Diana, the assassination of JKF and the events of September 11th 2001.

Lord James certainly knows a thing or two about high finance: he is a former senior adviser to the Conservative party, whose judgment is manifestly trusted by Michael Howard and David Cameron.

But his speech has a curious sweep: it begins with Brigadoon, the mythical village that appears for only one day every hundred years; it then moves on to an admission of money laundering billions of pounds of terrorist money on behalf of the IRA and unspecified African dictators; and ends with the claim that the Noble Lord has been recruited by the mysterious ‘Foundation X’ that wishes to invest £5 billion in the United Kingdom, with an extra £17 billion for hospital, schools and Crossrail by Christmas.

Apparently ‘Foundation X’ possesses huge reserves of ‘stateless’ funds all backed up with gold bullion. Lord James dismisses the observation that such colossal sums would amount to more than the entire gold bullion ever mined from the earth: there are things we simply do not know which, apparently, the Vatican bank does know (His Grace was intrigued to know more about this, but irritatingly the Government Whip Lord De Mauley interrupted the Noble Lord the moment he mentioned the Vatican, which is a delicious conspiracy within the conspiracy: was the recent visit by His Holiness simply a potential buyer viewing a prospective property?).

With such great wealth to bestow, ‘Foundation X’ is understandably a little reluctant to make itself widely known lest they be flooded with thousands of troublesome begging letters. Only a meeting with David Cameron or George Osborne will suffice: after all, why would ‘the most powerful and the most high-profile people on the whole world stage’ want to deal with anyone less?

So, for the past 21 weeks (he keeps a very accurate diary), Lord James has been investigating and working with the Foundation, and he has come to the ‘absolute conclusion that “Foundation X” is completely genuine and sincere and that it directly wishes to make the United Kingdom one of the principal points that it will use to disseminate its extraordinarily great wealth as part of an attempt to seek the recovery of the global economy."

Right.

So convinced is the Noble Lord that he has introduced the shadowy representatives of ‘Foundation X’ to the Leader of the House of Lords, Lord Strathclyde.

Apparently, they didn’t hit it off, and there were no invitations to drinks.

The Bank of England passed the enquiry on to the Treasury, which has done what the Treasury tends to do.

Sit on it.

And so, out of frustration that Her Majesty’s Government is about to miss an unmissable opportunity to reduce the deficit and invest in much-needed infrastructure, Lord James decided to tell the world.

And he apparently has the support of Treasury Minister, Lord Sassoon.

His Grace received a request yesterday evening from the Ambassador of the Inter-Galactic Federation, imploring him to comment upon this. And he is delighted to do so.

It was Disraeli who said: ‘The world is governed by very different personages from what is imagined by those who are not behind the scenes.’

But 'Foundation X' is not made up of such personages.

His Grace is sorry to spoil the conspiracy party, but this is an elaborate and very sophisticated hoax.

Lord James has neither lost his marbles nor encountered the dark forces of the Illuminati: intelligent men tend not to waste their time looking for the crock of gold at the end of the rainbow because they know the laws of physics and that rainbows are full circles. They tend not to believe in leprechauns or fairies at the bottom of the garden or little green men from Mars. The Noble Lord has simply been had, Jeremy Beadle-like, by a group who get kicks out of duping the gullible and naïve.

How does His Grace know?

Wikipedia is hardly reliable, for a shadowy organisation such as ‘Foundation X’ would be certain to employ anonymous minions to deflect unwanted attention and throw obsessive freelance investigators off the conspiracy scent.

But some ‘facts’ speak for themselves:

Who is Lord James?

As Lord Strathclyde has helpfully pointed out, he is 'not important enough' to be the go-between in such negotiations. It is widely known that ‘the most powerful and the most high-profile people on the whole world stage' do not need to use minions: they simply go for a jolly to Sitges and speak directly to whomever they wish about nuking Iran, propping up the Euro or ensuring the promotion of David Cameron to No10.

It is extremely unlikely (to put it mildly) that the IRA ever possessed anything like £1bn: and, if they did, it beggars belief that Lord James would have laundered it at the behest of the Bank of England while the terrorists were blowing up Margaret Thatcher and her entire Cabinet, and murdering women and children in Manchester and Enniskillen.

If they did, Lord Tebbit would have been onto the case.

As certain members of the House of Commons have recently discovered, Parliamentary privilege does not stretch to illegal activity: the Noble Lord should be immediately arrested and an investigation into these allegations must swiftly follow. If he had ‘extensive connections with North African terrorists’, and these still present a ‘security issue’, the matter is of the utmost importance.

The Noble Lord hastened to add: “…it is no good getting the police in, because I shall immediately call the Bank of England as my defence witness, given that it put me in to deal with these problems."

Having interviewed a sitting prime minister, Yates of the Yard would not be fazed by a few recumbent bankers.

More persuasively, what supranational body seeks to give away billions of pounds interest free with no repayment schedule and no strings attached?

Lord James said they wished to do this in order to preserve their fortune. Well, it doesn’t take a degree in economics to understand that this would be the quickest way of wiping out their fortune. At the very least, it would be diminished year-on-year by the ravages of inflation. And that inflation would only be be stoked by the moral hazard which 'Foundation X' would condone by bailing out the government of a country whose government is the very cause of their financial woes.

Even more persuasively, if a benevolent and philanthropic foundation worth billions wished to pour billions into establishing schools and hospitals, it would not seek to do so through the intolerable bureaucratic frustrations of central government: it would do so directly.

Ask Bill Gates.

Why would they bother with here-today-gone-tomorrow politicians when the world is already in the filthy hands of Mammon?

At the very least, we would have ‘Foundation X’ academies and ‘Foundation X’ hospitals and hospices, not to draw attention to the organisation itself but to ensure the efficient use of funds: when you get a Treasury sold on the idea of quantitative easing and Mugabe economics, it is not credible that ‘the most powerful and the most high-profile people on the whole world stage’ would seek to subsidise the very scam of fiscal incontinence by which their own assets would be significantly devalued.

Either His Grace is right in this, or the Noble Lord should take very great care.

If His Grace is wrong, we may soon find Lord James of Blackheath swinging under Blackfriars Bridge.

With weights in his pockets.

For he has drawn attention to the laundered billions of the Vatican Bank.

And people who do that tend not to live very long thereafter.

(Cue sinister music)

(Credits to end)

21 Comments:

Blogger Jared Gaites said...

Who is John Gault?

7 November 2010 at 10:55  
Blogger Jared Gaites said...

oops. John Galt. It all reminds me of the plot of Atlas Shrugged. Reardon Metal and the John Galt line . and the sinister Francisco d'Anconia. Hilarious Sunnday morning reading YG.

7 November 2010 at 11:07  
Blogger Jess The Dog said...

This isn't the whole story. The noble Lord omitted the part about the 'billions of oil wealth' in a 'Nigerian bank account' which needed an 'initial deposit of $50,000' to re-activate. Or something like that.

John le Carre used a similar plotline in the War on Terror context in his excellent novel 'Absolute Friends'...international foundation with money to burn that turns out to be very bad news indeed. So, in the unlikely event that there is any truth to this, it would be very bad news...terror, narco and porno billions looking for a washing machine...or a silent partner looking for some later advantage or opportunity for destabilisation (Robert Littell did this with the KGB in his epic CIA novel 'The Company'...which had a Vatican assassination).

The stuff of spy novels, indeed.

7 November 2010 at 11:33  
Anonymous Professor Charles Francis Xavier said...

Resistance is futile!

7 November 2010 at 12:00  
Anonymous Indigo said...

Jess the Dog is right - this must be the Nigerian scam dressed in ermine.

7 November 2010 at 16:23  
Anonymous JayBee said...

If a financial proposition sounds too good to be true, it usually is.

If it is a scam rather than a hoax, the offer to pump billions into the British economy could be a diversionary tactic. Maybe the real objective is to undermine the price of gold by convincing enough people that total gold reserves are far larger than generally believed.

7 November 2010 at 16:24  
Blogger Angus said...

Ha ha, many thanks Your Grace, this story has certainly brought a smile to this correspondent's lips.

Wear your poppy with pride!

7 November 2010 at 16:39  
Anonymous non mouse said...

Oh, Your Grace. Not another Italian Job! Which style of jacket best suits Lord James - concrete or strait?

Today's doubtful crediblity is but a shadow of tomorrow's. Many stories describe how to achieve that breakdown and institutionalise an individual. Yet... surely those fictions succeed because we all recognise the possibility that 'Truth is Stranger than Fiction.'

And methought Lord James seemed more concerned to discover Truth than to do laundry. He framed his narrative to that effect.

********
Interesting, on the other hand, that the other so-called noblemen seem to deny contact with the FoundX minions. The denials are as cloudy as the accusation, and so they, too, raise many questions.

Did the ignoble lords communicate -in any medium - with the crims? Isn't Sassoon's denial of 'meeting' ambiguous?
Why was Strathclyde absent from the Parliamentary presentation?

And, if the other 'lords' didn't ever discuss the matter, why would they let James present an hallucination to Parliament?
Why discredit him instead of helping him? Does he 'know too much' ... for such an unimportant peer?
Why has the Treasury refused to take up an offer that never existed?
Would Sassoon's best friend have quietly have gone along with such an ill-founded project - if James hadn't exposed it?
What underlies the refusal to investigate a possibly massive scam that could affect national security?

********
Oh... And that nasty bit of parchment - the Lisbonic affair ---which Italian vault is it in?

7 November 2010 at 18:33  
Anonymous Anguished Soul said...

wv: horlasm

Make of that what you will!

7 November 2010 at 19:06  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

7 November 2010 at 21:16  
Blogger Gnostic said...

Free money for the government to squander? Doesn't the honourable peer know that Foundation X is merely a codename for tax all citizens, tax 'em hard until the pips squeak?

7 November 2010 at 21:25  
Anonymous Oswin said...

Sod it, for a brief momemt I was becoming excited!

7 November 2010 at 22:59  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Ah Gnostic! Perspicacious as ever - you bring up taxes.
So I suppose it all has nothing to do with agreements our enemy (the gov't) have made with Swiss Banks - to alleviate taxation of our wealthy...
Or so the Grauniad suggested:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2010/oct/26/tax-avoidance-switzerland-agreement

8 November 2010 at 02:04  
Blogger ENGLISHMAN said...

Yet most people are content to sit in front of a television and accept the downright lies that are fed them,"global warming""internet and phone for only six pounds a month""life insurance for five pounds a month"and a whole host of incredible tripe,and the print media is even more deceitful,we are surrounded by lies because we lie to ourselves,since we refuse to believe that we are really that awful,"those that can make us believe absurdities,can make us commit atrocities"

8 November 2010 at 08:29  
Blogger Gnostic said...

Anon @ 2.04

So, it'll be business as usual then...

:D

8 November 2010 at 08:53  
Blogger Graham Davis said...

The man is a gullible fool. That he should be wasting the time of the upper house shows how urgently reform is needed. Let’s clear out all these old farts and let members be elected on their merits, an essential component of which is their grasp of reality. Lets us include the bishops in this clear out, as they too are fantasists only there because past governments have been too feeble minded to remove them.

8 November 2010 at 08:57  
Blogger ZZMike said...

There is apparently no correlation between being a "noble lord" and having an ounce of common sense. (I suggest faintly that there may be the same relationship placed on the Heir Apparent to the Throne of England.)

If the "supranational body" is ready to lend out "billions of pounds" (which means they must necessarily have trillions on hand, surely they could lend me and our gracious host a few quid until payday.....

9 November 2010 at 05:09  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

This will explain where the funds are coming from;
http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/archivos_pdf/history_banking.pdf

10 November 2010 at 17:50  
Anonymous James The Cat said...

I pity yout delusion and willingness to discredit Lord James. Have a little respect for a peer. Lord James has obviously done his utmost to verify the voracity of this Foundation's claims. Perhaps if you could reign in your smug rebuttal and willingness to paint this as some grand joke you might begin to see the reality of the world in which we live.

24 November 2010 at 01:50  
Blogger Steed said...

The big news is Lord James' claim that the B of E (not to be confused with the C of E, er, or should it?) laundered 1B pounds for the IRA. If true, it can only mean SIS has played Eire like a harp, pun intended.

Divide et impera, and all that.

If his claims are false, he'll be roundly dismissed as a nutter. If his claims are true, he'll be roundly dismissed as a nutter. In either case, one predicts he'll be enjoying an early retirement from the H of L, on indefinite leave at an undisclosed, well-guarded country manor somewhere in Hampshire.

1 January 2011 at 03:17  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Why is nobody talking about the 15 trillion laundered from the federal reserve in new york through hsbc and on to the bank of scotland ?? That was also part of his original speech. The massive fraud that was reported by him. Why are you saying this guy has lost it ?? good heavens people, when are you going to open your eyes, this is extreemely important and can not be allowed to be swept under the carpet.

23 February 2012 at 17:57  

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