Sunday, February 12, 2012

Whitney Houston passes into Glory



She was one of the greatest artists the Lord ever endowed. Amazing Grace, I love the Lord, I Believe, A Quiet Place, Jesus Loves Me, This Day, Do You Hear What I Hear? Whitney Houston is now at the Throne of God, and with Jesus for eternity. Thank you for the music. Rest in Peace.

46 Comments:

Blogger David said...

RIP, indeed. I note, however, that your list doesn't include 'Greatest Love of All', which is a profoundly un-Christian song - or perhaps just very sad and lonely.

12 February 2012 at 11:09  
Blogger baritoneuk said...

It was a shock to hear the news this morning. I hadn't realised she was a Christian and a faith. Although sad news, she is in a better place.

I have to agree with the last comment about the song "The Greatest Love of All", which has truly awful lyrics about the Greatest Love being the love of yourself.

12 February 2012 at 11:56  
Blogger Nibor said...

Is she dead ?

12 February 2012 at 12:00  
Blogger Anabaptist said...

Rather overwrought remarks, Cranny, concerning one of these currently fashionable wobbly-voiced female singers, whose chief talent seems to be the manipulation of a microphone.

'...one of the greatest artists the Lord ever endowed...'?

Move over, Michelangelo, Rubens, Rembrandt, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Wagner, Janet Baker, Yehudi Menuhin, Daniel Barenboim, etc., etc. Make space in your aesthetic parthenon for '...one of the greatest artists the Lord ever endowed... Good grief, Cranny, what are you one?

12 February 2012 at 12:04  
Blogger Anabaptist said...

Oops... I should have asked Cranny, 'What are you on?

@ Mr Nibor
Yep; she's dead. Cranny wasn't exaggerating there.

12 February 2012 at 12:07  
Blogger baritoneuk said...

It seems inappropriate to comment harshly on her voice after her death. I'd agree her voice had many technical issues, and I'd wholeheartedly agree with the list of wonderful artists given by the last commenter. However, it has to be said, Whitney Houston's voice gave joy and pleasure to millions of people round the world. Aesthetics are a personal thing.

12 February 2012 at 12:15  
Blogger Anabaptist said...

@baritoneuk: I would agree with much of what you say; however, my comment was not so much about the departed Ms Houston, as about Cranny's exaggerated estimate of her place on the roll of artists.

12 February 2012 at 12:28  
Blogger Archbishop Cranmer said...

Anabaptist,

Wrong side of the bed this morning? 'One of' implies neither finitude nor hierarchy. There was no comparison (if it were possible) with Michelangelo or Beethoven. 'Artist' is manifestly a reference to her formidable singing voice. You are, of course, free to disagree, but you are being obtuse and absurd by attacking an aesthetic opinion.

12 February 2012 at 12:39  
Blogger Office of Inspector General said...

A superb belter of a voice indeed. One can only wonder what she would have been capable of in her fifties...

12 February 2012 at 13:19  
Blogger Mr Integrity said...

Your Grace;
Inspired by prominent soul singers in her family, including her mother Cissy Houston, cousins Dionne Warwick and Dee Dee Warwick, and her godmother Aretha Franklin, Houston began singing with New Jersey church's junior gospel choir at age 11 'Wikipedia'.
How often have we seen a great talent start this way and then get carried away by fame, money and glory? I have some albums from Sister Rosette Tharpe. A number of musicians, ranging from Elvis Presley and Jerry Lee Lewis to Isaac Hayes and Aretha Franklin,(Whitney's Godmother) have identified her—or, more particularly, her singing, guitar playing and showmanship—as an important influence on them. Rosette also crossed the line from Gospel to secular Jazz but never forgot her Gospel roots.

12 February 2012 at 14:07  
Blogger E.xtra S.ensory Blofeld + Tiddles said...

Oh, Ernst does love a sunday on His Grace's blog.

Anabaptist said 12 February 2012 12:04

"Move over, Michelangelo, Rubens, Rembrandt, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Wagner, Janet Baker, Yehudi Menuhin, Daniel Barenboim, etc., etc. Make space in your aesthetic parthenon for '...one of the greatest artists the Lord ever endowed... Good grief, Cranny, what are you one?"

and then;

"Archbishop Cranmer said @12 February 2012 12:39

Anabaptist,

Wrong side of the bed this morning? 'One of' implies neither finitude nor hierarchy. There was no comparison (if it were possible) with Michelangelo or Beethoven. 'Artist' is manifestly a reference to her formidable singing voice. You are, of course, free to disagree, but you are being obtuse and absurd by attacking an aesthetic opinion."

Is there anything better than a good roast on a Sunday...A willing sacrificial lamb and a very good cook in perfect harmony! Bless You Anabaptist, Ernst has just added his favourite mint jelly to the fine dish served up. ;-)

The lass was a beauty with a brilliant range but unfortunately had that one weakness that most good girls have..a penchant for bad boys and the consequences that follow.

Ernst

12 February 2012 at 14:43  
Blogger Owl said...

Quite frankly, I have to agree with HG on this.

An enormous talent is no longer with us and the world is a little poorer, a little less bright.

I hope she now finds the peace which escaped her in her lifetime.

12 February 2012 at 15:08  
Blogger Cressida de Nova said...

I saw her live. She was very beautiful talented and sexy (in a Christian way of course)Her passing is sad.

12 February 2012 at 15:21  
Blogger carl jacobs said...

She burned her life to ashes through dissipation. She took money and fame and turned it into self-indulgence. There is a lesson here for every man - a lesson of sorrow and tragedy and regret. A reminder of the ever-present yet often suppressed reality that there is an end to things. Perhaps the least important statement that can be made of her life at this moment is "She was a great singer." Man is vapor, and his voice with him. No one will ever be called great in the Kingdom of Heaven because his voice.

carl

12 February 2012 at 15:34  
Blogger non mouse said...

Your Grace, please accept condolences on your loss.

Perceptive, Mr. B!
I, of course, had to turn on the video to see who she was. And yes, I heard that this one had a voice. And, once more, I saw the "star" system do its number.

Again then, let me add my prayers that the victim Requiescat in pace.

12 February 2012 at 15:47  
Blogger Office of Inspector General said...

Do put the boot in Carl. It’s alright you know, she’s dead, she won’t feel it...

12 February 2012 at 16:08  
Blogger carl jacobs said...

Funerals are for the living, OIG, and not the dead. The dead can feel nothing from me. When a famous celebrity dies, we all have a natural tendency to focus on the excellence that paved the road to fame. Man remembers the glory that was man. That is precisely the wrong focus. At such times, it is right to focus on the eternal and not the temporal. It will never be said of anyone "Well done, thou good and faithful servant, for you had a great voice and sang." Man does not exist to glorify man. Man exists to glorify God. The later measure is the measure by which a life should be remembered.

carl

12 February 2012 at 16:54  
Blogger len said...

A sad ending for a very talented Lady.

12 February 2012 at 17:01  
Blogger Office of Inspector General said...

Carl. Even you must admit your rush to condemn would be seen by others as indecent. Couldn’t you at least have waited until she was cold ? Then again, perhaps this is the Calvinist way. Lacks the Catholic warmth that comes out in these circumstances, when we acknowledge what sinners we are as one of us goes to be judged...

12 February 2012 at 17:10  
Blogger Archbishop Cranmer said...

'It will never be said of anyone "Well done, thou good and faithful servant, for you had a great voice and sang."'

Mr Carl Jacobs,

His Grace begs to differ. If we may infer anything from Exodus 31, it is that God supernaturally endows man with artistic gifts, and these gifts are spiritual. In calling Bezalel to build the Tabernacle, Scripture makes it clear that the work of an artisan is spiritual and dependent on the inspiration of the Holy Spirit. This being the case, man will be judged on what he did with that gift, and the extent to which it was (or was not) used to bring glory to the Creator.

Further, it is written: "And whatsoever ye do, do it heartily, as to the Lord, and not unto men; Knowing that of the Lord ye shall receive the reward of the inheritance: for ye serve the Lord Christ" (Col 3:23). Of those endowed with a voice like that of Whitney Houston, the Lord may very well say: "Well done, thou good and faithful servant, for you had a great voice and sang and brought me glory."

12 February 2012 at 17:14  
Blogger carl jacobs said...

OIG

I wasn't rushing to condemn. I was responding to the litany of triviality that this thread had become. Who cares whether she had a great voice? Who cares if she made some Gospel music videos? Who cares where she ranks in the historical list of artists? She had all the riches of the world handed to her and yet she is dead at 48. There are more important subjects to discuss about her life than her artistic value relative to Beethoven. If the best lesson you can derive from her life is "She made some great albums" then you are missing the point.

I do not stand in the presence of those who knew her and loved her. I know full well that you don't mention Romans 8 to someone the very day a loved one dies. You don't say to a grieving mother "You can have other children" on the morning her firstborn dies. We here do not have to guard the feelings of the bereaved. We can deal directly with the implications of death without first having to cover the corpse with rouge.

carl

12 February 2012 at 17:27  
Blogger Office of Inspector General said...

Carl. The litany of triviality you refer to are eulogies. When a life comes to end, is there no generosity of spirit within you that can stand back from your cold judgemental self and say “she had a gift, and made my life slightly better through it”. Remember, that gift didn’t come without strings attached; the package included a liking to associate with unsuitable men, and drug addiction. So let’s say she did indeed pay the price while she was breathing. And no, I wouldn’t want to swap places with her – the price she paid for what she had was too high...

12 February 2012 at 18:13  
Blogger bluedog said...

Mr Anabaptist @ 12.04, the correct terminology is 'Roll-over Beethoven', not 'move over'. Where were you?

12 February 2012 at 19:31  
Blogger Roy said...

@ Carl Jacobs

No one will ever be called great in the Kingdom of Heaven because his voice.

It surely depends on how they used their God given talents. The names "Moody" and "Sankey" were, and still are, very often used in the phrase "Moody and Sankey." Dwight L. Moody was arguably the greatest evangelist of the 19th century but in many of his meetings he shared top billing with the singer Ira D. Sankey.

12 February 2012 at 23:04  
Blogger non mouse said...

Ah, Mr. Jacobs: We can deal directly with the implications of death without first having to cover the corpse with rouge. You remind us of our universal heritage: as manifested by the Red Lady of Paviland! [As you will know, she's presently thought to be a man, and to date from about 24,000 B.C.]

Sadly, though we advanced for a while, our one-world culture requires us to retrogress. From that perspective, we might nevertheless interpret the symbolism of 'reddening' anew; especially now that both admirers and detractors can re-vivify memories of the deceased by video. I confess to occasional viewings of Elvis and Cash. The process helps me re-think many 'texts and contexts.' King David and the Psalms, are but one example.

At the 'blood level' of redness, mercantile 'stardom' is redolent of nothing less than human sacrifice.* Because today's subject involves Gospel Music, I consequently read both you and His Grace as allowing that we may take this opportunity to consider Divine Purpose. The One Almighty God tolerates mankind's practices, deviations, and predilections for our own benefit: We have so much to learn.


______________
*Deut 12: 23; and of course, Portia and the 'pound of flesh'(MOV IV.i: 305-11).

12 February 2012 at 23:44  
Blogger The Way of Dodo the Dude said...

Let us pray that Whitney is in the arms of God whatever her personal failings may have been.

I enjoyed her singing and her Gospel music was inspirational. She joins a growing number of talented artists who fell under the corrupting influence of the "entertainment industry".

May she rest in peace.

13 February 2012 at 00:01  
Blogger carl jacobs said...

Roy

The focus of my comment was on the word 'great.' Singing with technical skill is not the same thing as singing to glorify God. Better the man who sings poorly from faith than the man who sings well from unbelief. Archbishop Cranmer made my exact point earlier absent only this qualification. But the qualification is essential.

carl

13 February 2012 at 00:03  
Blogger The Way of Dodo the Dude said...

carl

After readingyour comments I have to say I'm hoping Jesus will be a little bit more forgiving when He comes to judge my loved ones and me than you have shown yourself to be. What if it were your daughter, your wife or mother who had died in such circumstances?

13 February 2012 at 00:23  
Blogger rodney said...

carl

Whilst the hysterical and misplaced hero worship that infests this world can at times be be vomit inducing, in the case of Ms Houston, this appears to be a heartbreakingly sad end to a tragic life. If all the trappings of this life are all 'vapor', then I would submit that so are the 'consolations' of fame and wealth. Where is she now? None of us know her heart, but it appears that though she was a weak and earthen vessel there are no indications that I have heard that she was a malicious person. Wounded, certainly - aren't we all? When I contrast her personal foibles with that of deliberate acts of wanton evil (as committed by e.g. Pres Obama) I cannot but think of the words of Matthew 12:20 that He will not crush the bruised reed or smother the wavering flame...' We entrust her soul to the mercy of Our Father.

13 February 2012 at 05:51  
Blogger E.xtra S.ensory Blofeld + Tiddles said...

Non Mouse said, wisely as ever.

\I confess to occasional viewings of Elvis and Cash. The process helps me re-think many 'texts and contexts.' King David and the Psalms, are but one example.' Indeed lass and if we include the comparison between Kings David and Saul we see the difference between the believers who keep their God in sight and close by and those who turn to this world and its offerings and die lost in their final moments.

Dodo said with Ernst in agreeal

"She joins a growing number of talented artists who fell under the corrupting influence of the "entertainment industry"." Indeed bird, or the false trappings of 'This World"

Ernst favourite words that are the path he continually tries to tread...

Proverbs 30:5-9

5 Every word of God is pure: he is a shield unto them that put their trust in him.
6 Add thou not unto his words, lest he reprove thee, and thou be found a liar.
7 Two things have I required of thee; deny me them not before I die:
8 Remove far from me vanity and lies: give me neither poverty nor riches; feed me with food convenient for me:
9 Lest I be full, and deny thee, and say, Who is the LORD? or lest I be poor, and steal, and take the name of my God in vain.


The major differences between believers both well known and unknown are ones sins and failings are made public whilst the other has similar failings but their/our sins are, by and large, known only between the Almighty and we.
We apologise/repent to The Lord only in private and do not have to give an account of ourselves to the media etc as celebrities must. WE MAY CRINGE IN PRIVATE!


May we never lose our tenderness and compassion for each other as sinners, lest we be found naked and out in the cold.

Ernst Blofeld

13 February 2012 at 09:21  
Blogger The Way of Dodo the Dude said...

carl and Ernst

Amen.

13 February 2012 at 09:35  
Blogger Gary said...

This comment has been removed by the author.

13 February 2012 at 10:18  
Blogger Gary said...

Pop music, and it's whole culture of sex 'n' drugs 'n' rock 'n' roll, can be effortlessly filed under "the filth of the world", and it is completely incompatible with the holy path. Christians shouldn't sing it, and Christians shouldn't listen to it.

13 February 2012 at 10:20  
Blogger IanCad said...

YG,

" Whitney Houston is now at the Throne of God, and with Jesus for eternity."

We all mourn for this great talent who sang so beautifully of G0d's love.

But what about the Resurrection at the second coming of Christ?
What about the Judgement?

Have you embraced Universalism?

13 February 2012 at 10:24  
Blogger Oswin said...

Something of a side-step here, but I'm rather more concerned with those artistes who seek to ride what they perceive as the 'zeitgeist', for their own deliberate ends. For instance, witness the younger Madonna and the current Lady Gaga.

NB. I'm still very much a fan of Whitney Houston's, Aunt Dionne; so 'I say a little prayer' and not just 'walk on by'...

13 February 2012 at 16:51  
Blogger Office of Inspector General said...

Och aye - What's the difference between Bing Crosby and Walt Disney...

Bing sings and Walt dis'nee

13 February 2012 at 19:38  
Blogger The Way of Dodo the Dude said...

On the sauce early Inspector?

13 February 2012 at 23:27  
Blogger Manfarang said...

The perils of drink and drugs. Smoking didn't do her voice any good either.
Sad loss.

14 February 2012 at 02:38  
Blogger Jon said...

How could anyone be anything but sad at the waste of a prodigious talent. I would have loved to have seen her perform, but when I went to see her last tour, she pulled out.

At her peak though, what a voice!

14 February 2012 at 11:49  
Blogger Office of Inspector General said...

Too right that bird; just exercising the old jokes. Rather yellowing now and curling at the edges, that one was probably hilarious when first heard 70 years ago...

14 February 2012 at 19:16  
Anonymous The Elder said...

Talented, yes. Sad she's gone, of course I am. But still wondering how a woman of faith could make those mistakes. Perhaps she was not strong enough to resist temptaion. As Jesus repeatedly said "pray that you do not fall into temptation". It is possible to be a Christian and survive in the music industry. And to stick to your convictions.
Take a look at Hayley Westenra, "the worlds best selling soprano of the 21st century" who manages to stick to her principles, and whose a capella rendition of Amazing Grace at the Christchurch earthquake memorial bash was rather better than Whitney Houston's, (in my opinion of course).

16 February 2012 at 22:13  
Anonymous Eliza said...

It's really sad, I meant she has this great voice that I yearned for yet she choose to go down a spiral path. They said, we shouldn't speak ill of the dead, but sometimes the truth must be told. Whitney was a drug addict who refuse to stay sober and that is the facts. She will be remembered by her music and her drug addiction that cost her death, anyway R.I.P

18 February 2012 at 15:42  
Blogger Dreadnaught said...

Uh-Oh - could be trouble in Paradise.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2103164/Whitneys-REAL-tragedy-giving-greatest-love--female-partner-Robyn-Crawford.html

19 February 2012 at 17:11  
Blogger The Way of Dodo the Dude said...

Hardly when you considers the author of the article and his particular ideological outlook!

Some people are so opportunistic it's sickening.

19 February 2012 at 23:40  
Blogger Dreadnaught said...

So that negates the content of any truth in what was reported - checked this out in detail have you?

20 February 2012 at 15:13  
Blogger The Way of Dodo the Dude said...

No and I doubt Thatchell has either. That's the point. How can he possibly claim homophobia caused her pain, suffering and ultimately her life?

20 February 2012 at 17:10  

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